academia, dungeons and dragons, phd

Pay-and-play with Dungeons and Dragons, and other updates

Getting paid to run Dungeons & Dragons games! It is a thing, and it is growing fast in Singapore. I love that storytellers and community organisers are being valued in this way, but I also wonder about this shift from hobby to business, and about the understanding of what a Dungeon Master’s skills are (as rule-enforcer, shared-space-maker, world-builder, keeper-of-secrets, and softcore mathematician).

In case you missed the first link above, I talked to professional DMs from Tinker Tales Studios and TableMinis, as well as Melvyn Sin, a freelance DM, here. We discussed safe spaces, the terrors of improv, and D&D for kids, among a thousand other things I wasn’t able to put into the piece but which I hope to transcribe and publish on the internet sometime soon.

(Issuing a hopeful call into the wild right now for a professional female DM in Singapore to reach out to me!)

In other news, I bought a Dungeon Meowster shirt that I will not stop wearing. Also, recently, I:

  • Have been working on my upgrade proposal and my ethics applications
  • Am playing Ghosts of Saltmarsh AND Descent into Avernus AND my home campaign
  • Am regretting playing a Warlock, because two spell slots is just so… few… spell slots
  • Got vaccinated! (Halfway)
  • Have been thinking a lot about D&D as a space to practise risk-taking and as an arena for children to learn social skills
  • Am trying to make this remote PhD stuff work with WhatsApp chats and Google Drives and missing in-person sociality

Come talk to me on Twitter @KellynnWee or Instagram @braided or email me (kellynn.wee [at] gmail [dot] com) if you have any interest in collaborating or also if you want to discuss favourite D&D classes or recommend good one-shots to run as a DM.

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academia, personal

Ang Mo Kio under lockdown

I’ve shared this widely and had it widely shared by my very supportive and beloved academic and friend community (thank you, thank you, thank you), many of whom read it carefully and wrote to me with their own reflections, but I want to archive it here, too.

Here’s an essay about everyday life during lockdown in Singapore, what walking Chai has taught me about my neighbourhood, and how people challenge surveillance by building new community spaces, published on anthrocovid.com.

I miss smiling at people unmasked; I miss the civil inattention we practise in trains and lifts and bus stops; I miss being alone in a sea of strangers while feeling cosseted and amused and calmed by the very many quirks of a crowd. I miss being an observer of the populated city.

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